prequalified for a mortgage

As you prepare to finance a new home, chances are you’ve come across mortgage pre-approval, mortgage pre-qualification, or possibly even both.So what does it mean to get pre-approved vs. get pre-qualified for a mortgage, and what’s the difference between the two?

The Skinny on Pre-Qualified. Getting pre-qualified is the initial step in the mortgage process, and it’s generally fairly simple. You supply a bank or lender with your overall financial picture, including your debt, income and assets. After evaluating this information, a lender can give you an idea of the size of the mortgage for which you qualify.

Without a letter from a lender stating that they’re willing to work with you on a mortgage and for how much, you do not know what you can afford. And real estate agents and sellers may not be wiling to listen to you – they will only pay attention to pre-approved buyers. They want to know you are serious and capable of buying the home.

You've probably heard that you should pre-qualify or get pre-approved for a mortgage if you're looking to buy property. These are two key steps.

“You get one shot to make an attractive offer package,” Platt says. That means having your mortgage financing all set with a pre-approval (not pre-qualified) letter in hand and verification of your.

The document requirements for mortgage preapproval vary by lender and your individual circumstances, but typically, you'll need to provide documents which.

best mortgage rates available A note about mortgage points: One way to get the best mortgage rates is to pay "points," or upfront interest paid to the bank that secures a lower long-term interest rate on your home loan. One point generally costs 1% of the total loan amount, so paying 1 point on a $200,000 mortgage would add $2,000 in upfront costs.

The mortgage pre-approval process is complex, but it's a necessary step in having the best chance of securing the house of dreams.